NotDeadYet is a simple, lightweight library to allow you to quickly add a health-checking endpoint to your .NET application.

It has integrations for ASP.NET MVC, WebApi and Nancy.

Why do I want this?

To easily generate something like this: http://www.uglybugger.org/healthcheck.

When scaling out a web applications, one of the first pieces of kit encountered is a load balancer. When deploying a new version of application we generally pull one machine out of the load-balanced pool, upgrade it and then put it back into the pool before deploying to the next one.

NotDeadYet makes it easy to give load balancers a custom endpoint to do health checks. If we monitor just the index page of our application, it's quite likely that we'll put the instance back into the pool before it's properly warmed up. It would be a whole lot nicer if we had an easy way to get the load balancer to wait until, for instance:

  • We can connect to any databases we need.
  • Redis is available.
  • We've precompiled any Razor views we care about.
  • The CPU on the instance has stopped spiking.

NotDeadYet makes it easy to add a /healthcheck endpoint that will return a 503 until the instance is ready to go, and a 200 once all is well. This plays nicely with New Relic, Amazon's ELB, Pingdom and most other monitoring and load balancing tools.

Awesome! How do I get it?

Getting the package:

Install-Package NotDeadYet

In your code:

var healthChecker = new HealthCheckerBuilder()
    .WithHealthChecksFromAssemblies(ThisAssembly)
    .Build();

Doing a health check

var results = healthChecker.Check();
if (results.Status == HealthCheckStatus.Okay)
{
    // Hooray!
} else {
    // Boo!
}

Adding your own, custom health checks:

By default, NotDeadYet comes with a single ApplicationIsOnline health check which just confirms that the application pool is online. Adding your own (which is the point, after all) is trivial. Just add a class that implements the IHealthCheck interface and off you go.

public class NeverCouldGetTheHangOfThursdays : IHealthCheck
{
    public string Description
    {
        get { return "This app doesn't work on Thursdays."; }
    }

    public void Check()
    {
        // Example: just throw if it's a Thursday
        if (DateTimeOffset.Now.DayOfWeek == DayOfWeek.Thursday)
        {
            throw new HealthCheckFailedException("I never could get the hang of Thursdays.");
        }

        // ... otherwise we're fine.
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

Or a slightly more realistic example:

 public class CanConnectToSqlDatabase : IHealthCheck
{
    public string Description
    {
        get { return "Our SQL Server database is available and we can run a simple query on it."; }
    }

    public void Check()
    {
        // We really should be using ConfigInjector here ;)
        var connectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MyDatabaseConnectionString"].ConnectionString;

        // Do a really simple query to confirm that the server is up and we can hit our database            
        using (var connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
        {
            var command = new SqlCommand("SELECT 1", connection);
            command.ExecuteScalar();
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}

There's no need to add exception handling in your health check - if it throws, NotDeadYet will catch the exception, wrap it up nicely and report that the health check has failed.

Framework integration

Integrating with MVC

In your Package Manager Console:

Install-Package NotDeadYet.MVC4

Then, in your RouteConfig.cs:

var thisAssembly = typeof (MvcApplication).Assembly;
var notDeadYetAssembly = typeof (IHealthChecker).Assembly;

var healthChecker = new HealthCheckerBuilder()
    .WithHealthChecksFromAssemblies(thisAssembly, notDeadYetAssembly)
    .Build();

routes.RegisterHealthCheck(healthChecker);

Integrating with Nancy

In your Package Manager Console:

Install-Package NotDeadYet.Nancy

Then, in your bootstrapper:

var thisAssembly = typeof (Bootstrapper).Assembly;
var notDeadYetAssembly = typeof (IHealthChecker).Assembly;

var healthChecker = new HealthCheckerBuilder()
    .WithHealthChecksFromAssemblies(thisAssembly, notDeadYetAssembly)
    .Build();

container.Register(healthChecker);

FAQ

How do I query it?

Once you've hooked up your integration of choice (currently MVC or Nancy), just point your monitoring tool at /healthcheck.

That's it.

If you point a browser at it you'll observe a 200 response if all's well and a 503 if not. This plays nicely with load balancers (yes, including Amazon's Elastic Load Balancer) which, by default, expect a 200 response code from a monitoring endpoint before they'll add an instance to the pool.

Does this work with X load balancer?

If your load balancer can be configured to expect a 200 response from a monitoring endpoint, then yes :)

Can I change the monitoring endpoint?

Of course. In MVC land, it looks like this:

var healthChecker = new HealthCheckerBuilder()
    .WithHealthChecksFromAssemblies(typeof(MvcApplication).Assembly)
    .Build();

routes.RegisterHealthCheck(healthChecker, "/someCustomEndpoint");

and in Nancy land it looks like this:

HealthCheckNancyModule.EndpointName = "/someCustomEndpoint";

Does this with with my IoC container of choice?

NotDeadYet is designed to work both with and without an IoC container. There's a different configuration method on the HealthCheckerBuilder class called WithHealthChecks which takes a Func<IHealthCheck[]> parameter. This is designed so that you can wire it in to your container like so:

public class HealthCheckModule : Module
{
    protected override void Load(ContainerBuilder builder)
    {
        base.Load(builder);

        builder.RegisterAssemblyTypes(ThisAssembly, typeof (IHealthCheck).Assembly)
            .Where(t => t.IsAssignableTo<IHealthCheck>())
            .As<IHealthCheck>()
            .InstancePerDependency();

        builder.Register(CreateHealthChecker)
            .As<IHealthChecker>()
            .SingleInstance();
    }

    private static IHealthChecker CreateHealthChecker(IComponentContext c)
    {
        var componentContext = c.Resolve<IComponentContext>();

        return new HealthCheckerBuilder()
            .WithHealthChecks(componentContext.Resolve<IHealthCheck[]>)
            .WithLogger((ex, message) => componentContext.Resolve<ILogger>().Error(ex, message))
            .Build();
    }
}

This example is for Autofac but you can easily see how to hook it up to your container of choice.

Why don't the health checks show stack traces when they fail?

For the same reason that we usually try to avoid showing a stack trace on an error page.

Can I log the stack traces to somewhere else, then?

You can wire in any logger you like. In this example below, we're using Serilog:

var serilogLogger = new LoggerConfiguration()
    .WriteTo.ColoredConsole()
    .WriteTo.Seq("http://localhost:5341")
    .CreateLogger();

return new HealthCheckerBuilder()
    .WithLogger((ex, message) => serilogLogger.Error(ex, message))
    .Build();

Do the health checks have a timeout?

They do. All the health checks are run in parallel and there is a five-second timeout on all of them.

You can configure the timeout like this:

var healthChecker = new HealthCheckerBuilder()
    .WithHealthChecksFromAssemblies(typeof(MvcApplication).Assembly)
    .WithTimeout(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
    .Build();

What does the output from the endpoint look like?

It's JSON and looks something like this:

{
  "Status": "Okay",
  "Results": [
    {
      "Status": "Okay",
      "Name": "ApplicationIsRunning",
      "Description": "Checks whether the application is running. If this check can run then it should pass.",
      "ElapsedTime": "00:00:00.0000006"
    },
    {
      "Status": "Okay",
      "Name": "RssFeedsHealthCheck",
      "Description": "RSS feeds are available and have non-zero items.",
      "ElapsedTime": "00:00:00.0005336"
    }
  ],
  "Message": "All okay",
  "Timestamp": "2015-11-14T11:42:35.3040908+00:00",
  "NotDeadYet": "0.0.10.0"
}